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Home > Communications > Voices of the Coast > Oral Histories > Chris Cenac, Sr.

ORAL HISTORIES

INTERVIEWEE NAME: Dr. Chris Cenac

IDENTIFICATION (title): Chris Cenac Interview

INTERVIEWER: Don Davis

DATES: 9-15-11

FOCUS DATES (dates of things they’re talking about): 1809 - 1920

SUMMARY: Dr. Chris Cenac is talking about the book he wrote, Eyes of an Eagle. The book describes the history of Houma, Louisiana, through the eyes of Dr. Chris Cenac’s great-grandfather Jean Pierre Cenac, Sr. The Cenac family made many contributions to the improvement of technology and modernization of Houma and the surrounding areas. These include Houma Fish & Oyster Company, the first Ford dealership, and Louisiana Crushing Company. He also described the events leading up to the invention of the can, the air conditioner, the label making process, and getting gasoline out of the ground. He describes how the oyster industry started in Houma and how the canals were dug so that people could travel by boat from Westwego to the Atchafalaya River. He gives a very detailed account of what is going on in south Louisiana and the United States during this time period.

RECORDINGS (1 of 1, 1 of 2 … :) 1of 1

TOTAL PLAYING TIME: 110:15

# PAGES TRANSCRIPT: 15

RESTRICTIONS: none

Listen to Audio
(100.93MB MP3 audio file)

View Transcript
(267KB PDF)

 

 

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